Friday, November 28, 2008

ABC explains Recycle Bank

Here is ABCs three minute clip on Recycle Bank, explaining the environmental and financial benefits to residents:
If you get a chance to watch it, I'd love to hear your comments.

I think something like this could work in CT, but I have no idea on the logistics of making it happen.

Tim White

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

Today's conversation is about who can would charge less per ton of trash.

Instead, it should be how can we reduce the total cost of trash disposal.

By owning the trash plant, the towns would have a greater interest in reducing the total cost of trash and would have a greater interest in recycling and other programs to reduce trash at its source.

Anonymous said...

Single stream recycling is the way to go. People will recycle if it is convenient. The idea of the state trying to get the 5 cents back on non-returned cans won't work. The bottling companies, faced with the loss of $25 million, will just raise the cost of the product to recoup their loss, hence raising the cost to all, including those who have taken the time and effort to recycle. BTW, according to one of the owners of AJ Waste, the town currently gets the 5 cents for all returnables put into the curbside recycle bins, under an agreement with AJ, our current contractor. Expanding the bottle bill to water bottles, etc. or raising it to 15 cents a container will decrease sales.
Single stream is easy, convenient, and more cost-effective than our current system. 70 CT cities already have it. The state should adapt it state-wide and repeal the bottle bill and its associated costs to merchants.
http://www.crra.org/documents/press/2008/CRRA_single-stream_recycling_4-24-2008.pdf

tim white said...

Single stream would be great. Then if we could tack on a Recycle Bank, I wouldn't be surprised if we increased Cheshire's recycling from 20-25% up to 50-80%.

If we could take our current annual 8200 tons of household garbage down to 4100 tons, we'd save that $70/ton tip fee and about $250,000 - 300,000 / yr.

Then give the 9,000 households a $30 gift certificate to be used at local retailers - like the eco-friendly store in the Watch Factory.

Sure, that's simplistic. But the concept used by Recycle Bank is sound.